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The Yogyakarta What? Print E-mail
By Austin Ruse   
Thursday, 25 June 2009

This is likely this first time you have ever heard of the Yogyakarta Principles. But have you ever heard of Roman Wieruszewski? Or Robert Wintemute? Dimitrina Petrova? What about Sunit Pant? Does Manfred Nowak ring a bell? You have never heard of any of them?

Funny you wouldn’t know them, because they and a handful of their friends have written a document that asserts a plethora of new human rights, which is being read approvingly in the U.S. Department of State. Even now, U.N. committees and Member States are finding ways to implement the ideas in this document.

The Yogyakarta Principles was drafted by a largely unknown group of lawyers, academics, homosexual activists, and U.N. bureaucrats, and was promulgated two years ago at United Nations headquarters in New York. In short, the document tries to read “gender identity and sexual orientation” as a new category into long-standing human rights treaties.

The document says that your “sexual orientation and gender identity are integral to (your) dignity and humanity and must not be the basis for discrimination and abuse.”

It defines your “sexual orientation as (your) capacity for profound emotional, affectional (sic) and sexual attraction to, and intimate and sexual relations with, individuals of a different or the same gender or more than one gender.”

It characterizes your “gender identity as (your) deeply felt internal and individual experience of gender, which may or may not correspond with the sex assigned at birth, including the personal sense of the body (which may involve, if freely chosen, modification of bodily appearance or function by medical, surgical or other means) and other expressions of gender, including dress, speech, and mannerism.”

Did you even know you had a gender identity and that it comes with a packet of human rights enforceable by the United Nations?

In essence, the Yogyakarta Principles takes a long list of rights – to life, work, assembly, health, fair trial and so on – and reads “gender identity and sexual orientation” into them as new categories of non-discrimination like sex, nationality, race, and religion. The document says your “deeply felt internal and individual experience of gender” is the same thing as your skin color and that you cannot be discriminated against because of it.

Among other things, the document would make any kind of marriage a universally recognized human right, along with adoption of children by transgender bi-sexuals or any other psychosexual combo package.

The document guarantees the freedom of children to determine their “gender identity” and gives the state the power to intervene to overcome objections from mom and pop. It even calls for criminal sanctions against moms and dads who object too strenuously.

It guarantees that children will learn about “sexual orientation and gender identity” and any attempt by families, schools, or churches to stop this would be human rights violations. Poland refuses to allow homosexual propaganda into its schools. This would certainly be in violation of these new human rights.

But perhaps the most frightening part of this document guarantees that those with “diverse sexual orientation and gender identity” have a human right not to hear criticism of their life styles. The document goes so far as calling for criminal sanctions against those who would criticize homosexuality and other such pathologies.

These are not new human rights. Not a single U.N. human rights treaty even mentions sexual orientation or gender identity. Efforts to bring up these terms in official U.N. resolutions are repeatedly defeated by Member States of the United Nations.

How did they come to us then?

They begin in the activist community, but gain real traction in U.N. treaty compliance committees. These are the bodies that states must appear before to explain how they are implementing treaties. These bodies have taken it upon themselves to reinterpret hard law treaties in ways that the drafters and ratifying nations never intended.

“Sexual orientation and gender identity” are not a part of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, for instance, but that compliance committee has reinterpreted the convention to include them. The same has happened with the body that monitors governmental compliance with the International Covenant on Economic, Social, and Cultural Rights. Both committees now routinely direct governments to change their laws to include nondiscrimination based on “sexual orientation and gender identity.”

These committee actions confirm for the “human rights community” that there are new international standards. And – poof – out come the Yogyakarta Principles confirming there are new and universally recognized human rights. In the echo chamber of human rights law, activists then point to the Yogyakarta Principles as further proof of their case.

The drumbeat continues as governments begin to act and international pressure builds against recalcitrant states, which then become pariah nations to be mocked and even shunned.

Note that democratic procedures are rarely if ever used in the promotion of these new rights. No votes are taken. Citizens are not aware this is going on. And only non-democratic bodies are used to advance these ideas for a very good reason: Do you think anyone would actually vote for transgender bisexuals to adopt children?

In case you were wondering, the Obama administration signed a document earlier this year that calls for “sexual orientation and gender identity” to be a new category of nondiscrimination in human rights treaties. Sound like the Yogyakarta Principles?


Austin Ruse is the President of the New York and Washinton, D.C.-based Catholic Family & Human Rights Institute (C-FAM), a research institute that focuses exclusively on international social policy.

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Comments (7)Add Comment
0
Charlatan?
written by Willie, June 26, 2009
It should be alarming to be aware that our leader is in bed with the wealthy abortionists,radical feminists and homosexual activists. This Yogyakarta proposition not conceived in liberty nor dedicated to the proposition that all men are created equal, is a contrivance of wealthy activists with a will to control universal freedoms and the extermination of all moral "first principles." This good piece is a needed wake up call to the resurrection of Hegel and Neitzsche and "one world order."
0
...
written by CB, June 26, 2009
Sad to say this should come as no surprise. For anyone who was listening, Obama identified himself as a citizen of the world early on. Hence the campaign speech in Berlin. His father was of the U.N. bureaucrat mentality and he is his father's son. He has yet to give a major speech in which the United States or any other western nation is raised above any other. That includes western values and long held moral principles. We are going down a very steep slope.
0
Student
written by Achilles, June 26, 2009
Ditto Jennifer, when narcissism drives policy this is what we get. All this catering to disorder does is put off the inevitible. Pay now or pay later, but don't forget the accrued compound interest for paying later. This will not end well. Thanks so much Mr. Ruse for the informative article.
0
Professor
written by Jennifer B, June 27, 2009
I wish people were as excited and articulate about their responsibilities as they are about their so-called rights. Since when has social security or employment been considered a right for the poorest people in the world?
0
Praying for you!
written by debby, June 29, 2009
dear austin & cathy,
i am praying for you. you deal w/the most ugly wages of sin & i dont know how you laugh, live & love let alone sleep. may our Lady Most Pure enfold you & guard you from all corruption you face for our sakes, just so we wont be sleeping, so we can fight a little. may the wounds of our Beloved wash your mind & give you His sound Spirit. your joy will be so full in Heaven!
all of Heaven's blessings to you, even now, in this valley of tears!
0
Reader
written by Linda Wolpert Smith, July 01, 2009
My computer is not registering any comments for this post. In one way, I am not surprised. The subject matter is terrifying. On the other hand, it is also not forgettable. How very strange that people who believe they should be protected from non-agreesive, reasoned negative opinions would think it acceptable for other people to be deprived of basic, fundamental freedoms and subject to criminal penalties for their beliefs.
0
...
written by Michael, July 03, 2009
The Obama admin recently added Harold Koh, an ultra liberal internationalist to be the state department's legal advisor. I wonder if he had a part in this? This sounds like something that Obama and Koh would be interested in since they know it would never pass in the Congress. Ram it through internationally and avoid the Congress and the American people in the still of night. What about national sovereignty?? Very troublesome!!!

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