The Catholic Thing
HOME        ARCHIVES        IN THE NEWS        COMMENTARY        NOTABLE        DONATE
Post-Christian America Print E-mail
By Fr. C. John McCloskey III   
Sunday, 19 August 2012

When we reach the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Revolution in 2017, will Protestantism still be a presence in the United States?

America is no longer a Christian country. Deal with it and act accordingly. Denial will get you nowhere. After death, however, there is the possibility of resurrection.

What is the definition of a Christian country? Mine is a country that has a majority of citizens who believe in and publicly profess the Nicene or Apostles Creed, as these creeds have come down to us from the Ancient Church – people who at least attempt to live according to the Ten Commandments. 

Of course, we are all sinners. But the proof that we are even more pagan than formerly Christian Europe – or the Islamic countries for that matter – is the piling up of more than a million abortions per year (killing our own citizens) since 1973.

“Christian” America has already killed enough of its unborn to easily surpass Nazi Germany’s extermination camp total and may soon catch up with the death rolls of the U.S.S.R. and Red China. No true Christian country that has recourse to democratic voting could countenance such massacre without regime change or rebellion.

On top of this, the number of divorces and illegitimate births continues to rise, as fewer “couples” bother to get married and the number of people addicted to pornography skyrockets. In short, the social revolution of the 1960s captured the culture and converted much of the nation. According to a new Pew poll, the number of Americans who profess a belief in no religion at all has tripled since the 1990s, now accounting for one in five of our countrymen.

My purpose here, however, is not to prove that America is no longer a Christian country but to reflect on why and how it happened.

Many of the first settlers came to the Americas to escape religious persecution. With the solitary exception of Maryland (my home state, settled by Catholics), these early settlers were Protestants of various persuasions. They differed from one another in dogma, but generally agreed in professing and attempting to live a moral life based on the Ten Commandments.

Though bestowed by God on Mt. Sinai, the Commandments are also commonly held (even when not lived up to) by non-Judeo-Christians and unbelievers who recognize the natural law written on our hearts.


          Alexis de Tocqueville

With the passage of time, homegrown American Protestant sects sprang up so profusely that they now can be counted in the thousands. Despite this variety, almost all shared a biblical moral philosophy not far removed from Catholics. The loosening of divorce laws and the propagation of the birth control pill in the Sixties, however, precipitated further retreat mere decades later by mainstream and traditional Protestant denominations on other moral fronts, including abortion, homosexual activity, and most recently same-sex marriage.

The primary reason is the lack of dogmatic authority in Protestantism and the reliance on the principle of private judgment. Leaving people to rely on only their opinions or feelings as moral guide is not enough to sustain a country that was once Christian and now is increasingly pagan.

What is the solution? Can American become Christian again? In my judgment, mainstream Protestantism is in an irreversible freefall. Don’t count on any great religious revivals. America needs witness, not enthusiasm. The United States will either become predominantly Catholic in numbers, faith, and morals or perish under the weight of its unbridled hedonism and corruption. As Alexis de Tocqueville, the nineteenth-century French observer who arguably best understood the United States, observed:

At the present time, more than in any preceding age, Roman Catholics are seen to lapse into infidelity, and Protestants to be converted to Roman Catholicism. If you consider Catholicism within its own organization, it seems to be losing; if you consider it from outside, it seems to be gaining. Nor is this difficult to explain. The men of our days are naturally little disposed to believe; but as soon as they have any religion, they immediately find in themselves a latent instinct that urges them unconsciously towards Catholicism. Many of the doctrines and practices of the Roman Catholic Church astonish them, but they feel a secret admiration for its discipline, and its great unity attracts them. If Catholicism could at length withdraw itself from the political animosities to which it has given rise, I have hardly any doubt but that the same spirit of the age which appears to be so opposed to it would become so favorable as to admit of its great and sudden advancement.

One of the most ordinary weaknesses of the human intellect is to seek to reconcile contrary principles and to purchase peace at the expense of logic. Thus there have ever been and will ever be men who, after having submitted some portion of their religious belief to the principle of authority, will seek to exempt several other parts of their faith from it and to keep their minds floating at random between liberty and obedience. But I am inclined to believe that the number of these thinkers will be less in democratic than in other ages, and that our posterity will tend more and more to a division into only two parts, some relinquishing Christianity entirely and others returning to the Church of Rome. 
I hope and believe that readers will live to see that happen in this life – if not the next.
 
 
Fr. C. John McCloskey III is a Church Historian and Research Fellow at the Faith and Reason Institute in Washington, DC.
 
 
The Catholic Thing is a forum for intelligent Catholic commentary. Opinions expressed by writers are solely their own.

Rules for Commenting

The Catholic Thing welcomes comments, which should reflect a sense of brevity and a spirit of Christian civility, and which, as discretion indicates, we reserve the right to publish or not. And, please, do not include links to other websites; we simply haven't time to check them all.

Comments (51)Add Comment
0
...
written by s Jack,CT, August 18, 2012
no one can argue Father, you are so correct.It seems we have
lost "our" way.I pray we find faith in our country as
we live in a dark time. thanks for the powerful words
0
...
written by Deacon Ed Peitler, August 19, 2012
It is now encumbent upon American Catholics to become active in evangelization efforts. Every parish, every diocese must see its primary mission as one of evangelization. We will know whether this is happening by the number of adult baptisms annually -going up, or doing down. That's how we will get to know how we are doing as a Church. Great piece by Fr. McCloskey.
0
...
written by Peter, August 19, 2012
If we could just get Catholics evangelized it would change the culture. But it's simply problematic. People in my parish went out of their way (with full encouragement from the pastor) to show and discuss the very excellent "Catholicism" catechizing series by Father Robert Barron and his team. 10 sequential evenings. You know how many people came, week in and week out, 35 to 40! 2,000 FAMILIES (not people, FAMILIES) in this parish.

Now, frankly, if that series can't draw people, they're dead from the neck up!

My point? We may have a post Christian Church on our hands, not just a post Chrisitan society. I hope not, but it doesn't look good from my vantage point.
0
...
written by Grump, August 19, 2012
"The United States will either become predominantly Catholic in numbers, faith, and morals or perish under the weight of its unbridled hedonism and corruption."

My money is on perishing.

I agree, Protestantism has largely had it. But the Catholic Church is crumbling as well as it tries to fight two wars: one against secularism, which it is losing, and the other against the thousands of priests and nuns and vast numbers of the laity who are in revolt. The "foot soldiers," if you will, are either challenging or disobeying their commanders back in Rome. With the Church in disarray how can Catholics spark a revival when they themselves are in sharp disagreement about what to obey or preach? And what potential convert could understand much less follow such conflicting and jumbled messages?

Fifty years after Vatican II's liberalizing "reforms" there comes the bitter fruit of dissension and disunity. Rome is desperately trying to hold the center together against a rising tide of rebellion. This does not bode well for the author's hope that Catholics can win the day.
0
...
written by Mr. Patton, August 19, 2012
" If Catholicism could at length withdraw itself from the political animosities to which it has given rise,"

American Catholics are far more political than ever, which leads to an interesting dilemma.
0
...
written by Bill Russell, August 19, 2012
Catholicism (as distinguished from Catholics) would be the template for a most just and equitable society. But in practice, the most corrupt governments in the New World have been the "Catholic" countries of Central and Latin America. And save for the Ottoman Empire, the Papal States were the most corrupt in modern history. God help us if the USCCB were to run the USA with the CCHD in charge of the Department of Welfare. The cars in the parking lot of the USCCB headquarters still have Obama bumper stickers. Governor Keating of Oklahoma said the dealing with the US bishops was like dealing with the Mafia. And now, after the the fasting enjoined upon the lay people in the Fortnight for Freedom, we have the specter of the gourmand Cardinal Dolan enjoying champagne with Obama.
0
...
written by Gabe, August 19, 2012
Thanks Father!
"America is no longer a Christian country. Deal with it and act accordingly."
Thank God someone has the guts to say it.

"What is the definition of a Christian country?"
Well actually, my first argument would not be based on population, but on whether or not that country is a Christian commonwealth. Population would be second in my book.

However, I think the problems go deeper, much deeper than the 1960s. Do yourselfs a favor and check out this book, yes it's long, but what it says needs to be heard.
http://www.amazon.com/Liberty-God-That-Failed-Constructing/dp/1621380068
While this book is specifically aimed at conservative Catholics, anyone can and should read it.

I too pray that someday this country and the rest of the west will see the light and come home.
0
...
written by Brother Rolf, August 19, 2012
Catholicism has been watered down and polluted with the likes of the LCWR, Nancy Palousey, Joe Forbiden and their ilk.
0
...
written by David Zacchetti, August 19, 2012
The only solution to the current crisis in the Church and in the world is the consecration of Russia to the Immaculate Heart as Our Lady requested at Fatima.
0
...
written by Mark, August 19, 2012
Wow...It is a good thing that the early Church had it so easy! I mean; with the Crucifixions and burning at the stake...our problems today are just beyond pale. I think Matthew Kelly does make a good point...it's really the parking lot, that is the problem. Oh, wait, I can't see it because the log in my eye is too big! We do have liberals who call themselves Catholic and we must engage and confront them all in a respectful but determined manner. We are the only ones that have The Truth. CJ is right, as usual, quit complaining and get engaged. How many people did you call to come to the series? If it was like mine; our Priest didn't bother to show up; he sent our liberal Deacon...I still invited others and made sure I was in attendance. We have well over 2,000 families and I am very interested to see the turnout for our new venture "Faithful" Citizenship when our parish priest voted for Nobama and plans to again. I will be there every week possible and will challenge anything that goes against our Church and will not back down. A priest told me to switch parishes a few months ago but I can't - that would allow them to continue to distort the Truth unabated. Good news...We've added a weekly Rosary, weekly Adoration and believe it or not...We didn't have a permanent Crucifix on the Alter...Thanks to a very generous Parishioner...We do now! Praise God...Our Paraclete continues to intervene and provide. A True, Catholic Church is all we have left to rebuild our culture and society. The communists of the left cannot win, we must stop killing babies and accept immoral behaviors without comment. Speak the Truth - always...even if you risk losing your job, some "friends", being mocked. Jesus didn't say this was the easy path! God Bless us all!
0
...
written by Craig, August 19, 2012
Only a return to Traditional Catholicism-the Traditional Latin Mass and Sacraments and true catechesis (think before the 1900's)-can save this country. From ~1950's on really lost our way and went to Hell. Mary ora pro nobis!
0
...
written by Maggie Louise, August 19, 2012
"It is now encumbent upon American Catholics to become active in evangelization efforts."

Heaven forbid! when you consider the level and depth of Catholic catechesis, Catholic belief, and Catholic knowledge in the vast majority of our parishes. I saw a short segment of a diocesan program on this very topic on TV last evening, and those people were scary--especially the polyester pantsuit nun with the coiffed hair, made up to a fare-thee-well, and jewelry galore. The program she was promoting made chills run down our spines.

"The "foot soldiers," if you will, are either challenging or disobeying their commanders back in Rome."

The real foot soldiers that I know are not challenging Rome, but are challenging their bishops and what comes out of the chanceries and diocesan offices. They are faithful and extremely knowledgeable about what Catholicism teaches, they have large families, and are often daily communicants, children and all. That is because the parish priest is faithful, extremely knowledgeable, and is not afraid or ashamed to teach the whole Faith--all of it, and live it. It must not be forgotten, however, that "God has no grandchildren." Every last one of those faithful children must experience his own inner conversion and become a faithful Catholic foot soldier. Neither his parents nor his priest can do it for him.

Speaking as a convert married to a convert and knowing many converts, I can't think of any who were evangelized by any program. Every convert seems to have his own story. Indeed, when we first approached the parish in which we lived, we couldn't find a priest who was interested in our story. We had to break the door down, and that, after having been warned by my husband's mother that there was a Catholic behind every rock waiting to grab you and pull you in. Boy, was she wrong.

Recently I met a former acquaintance who is considering coming into the Church. A friend of hers, also a convert, told her, "At first it's a honeymoon, and then it's hard work." I agreed with that statement and added, "And you will have your heart broken along the way."

We hear a great deal about mystery in the Church. Well, conversion is a mystery as well. No one can explain why or how he was touched by grace, but it very often came as a surprise, and, more often than not, it is n spite of--not because of--parish or diocesan programs. Fr. McCloskey ought to be able to speak on that issue, since he has helped so many find their way through the maze. It would be an interesting topic for a TCT essay.
0
...
written by Lindie, August 19, 2012
Well said Father! But this is no time for discouragement. God has already won the day for us. As Blessed Mother Theresa used to say, we are called to be faithful and to leave the rest to God. Although, it appears we are losing many in the spiritual battle, this faithful remnant will no doubt become the victim souls for the many who have embraced the lies of Satan and are falling in battle by the multitudes. This brings to mind the last secret of Fatima. Now is the time to strengthen ourselves should this great battle happen in our lifetime. Peace.
0
...
written by Hart Ponder , August 19, 2012
God may have other plans: Daniel 2:44 John 18:36
0
...
written by savvy, August 19, 2012
I think some of the posters here are missing the point. Catholicism is not made up of monolitic thinkers on government, economics, arts etc.

The Church survived the reformation, but the reformation did not survive endless division. Thousands of churches, invoking God for their conflicting doctrines. Catholics dissents play the same games.

I am taking the long view on why Catholicism will attract those Christians looking for doctrinal stability.
..., Low-rated comment [Show]
0
...
written by Graham Combs, August 19, 2012
I sometimes kid -- or shock -- evangelicals and my fellow Catholics about those Roman Baptist parishes that arose from the 70s and 80s. I believe that de Tocqueville ascribed the return to the Church by Americans in part to our Constitutional liberties and individual freedoms. My mother was Southern Baptist and my father Episcopalian (both born and raised in Appalachia). Consequently I don't find those parochial blended families that alien. As a convert to the Church I discovered that the Gather hymnal includes hymns my mother would recognize (How Great Thou Art) as well as my father (In Christ there is no East nor West). De Tocqueville could not predict HOW that return to the Church would take place and I believe it was this liturgical Roman Baptist Catholicism that made the Church welcoming to Americans raised in the Christianity of the wild West and Wilder South. Personally I lean toward my Anglican heritage and have been surprised by another development thanks to His Holiness Benedict XVI. This story is an old one. The history of Salvation is a history of surprise.
..., Low-rated comment [Show]
0
...
written by Puritan, August 19, 2012
Fr., McCloskey, the problem isn't Protestants, it's Catholic hypocrites who make holy Christians of all denominations cringe. My husband's "Catholic" sister-in-law, for example, bullies me (a formerly Orthodox person) for not believing in Medjugorje and obnoxiously brags about going to church everyday and tithing, but she has a child out of wedlock from a previous relationship, and to my horror, almost all her "religious" Catholic friends are not much better, if not worse. It's not fair to blame Protestants for America's decline when the Catholic Church is full of grave sinners who think they are better than everyone simply because they attend Mass daily and donate money. As my husband says, "Jesus didn't just want a following, he wanted followers." Sadly, aside from myself, my husband is pretty much the only other Catholic person I know who has lived a pure life according to the teachings of the Church, and this includes the people in our own families (excluding parents, grandparents and select others). Don't accuse Protestantism when instead, you should be pointing your finger at the millions of false Catholics and many Catholic priests who have given-up and just expect the worst of people (i.e. illegimate children, premarital sex, drugs, etc.) The leadership of the Church needs to be cleansed of its apathy and adopt higher standards. To that effect, I agree, the Church needs more Protestant converts. The Church needs to be purified.
0
...
written by H. Reeves, August 19, 2012
That was an interesting comment by de Tocqueville. I have read his words before but never those. It is hard to say where Protestantism will be in the future. Catholicism certainly seems to be suffering now. Who knows what the future holds.

0
...
written by DePrisco, August 19, 2012
Reading the words of de Tocqueville that you printed, I can't help but think of Vatican II and its "Aggiornamento" and the Hegelian "thesis, antithesis, synthesis" garbage that was used to try and make peace with Modernism.

"One of the most ordinary weaknesses of the human intellect is to seek to reconcile contrary principles and to purchase peace at the expense of logic." This is what Vatican II did with respect to so many things like "religious freedom," "outside the church no salvation," ecumenism, etc.
0
...
written by Bill Johnson, August 20, 2012
I believe that the 500th anniversary of the Protestant Reformation will be celebrated in 2017 not 2027 as stated in you article.
0
...
written by Chris in Maryland, August 20, 2012
I agree with Fr. M. And the concerns raised by faithful Catholics here about the quality of catechesis point out one great challenge that has always been there, but many cradle Catholics (like me) have come to learn the hard way. You can't be a Catholic and just fly on auto-pilot. That gets you nowhere fast. Catholicism is a smart religion, but just knowing your faith, to say nothing of living it, is a school for life...and you gotta keep doing the homework.
0
...
written by Joseph, August 20, 2012
I'm with Mother Theresa: we are called to be faithful and leave the rest to God. (Thank you, Lindie.) Jesus was a failure in the eyes of the world. He was divinely successful in the eyes of the Father. Too often, I fear, we measure religious "success" with worldly criteria. Perhaps we should measure religious "success" in terms of worldly failure. Did not Paul write: It is when I am weak that I am strong?
0
...
written by peter oziegbe, August 20, 2012
only God can save the world right now. But let us call on him at all times.
0
...
written by c matt, August 20, 2012
We are not a Christian Nation.

I think Fr.'s point is that Christian is as Christian does. It's not just a matter of counting self-professed numbers.
0
...
written by Maggie Louise, August 20, 2012
"Accepting 'dogmatic authority' is dangerous. Even the Pope is only infallible on faith and morals exclusively. It would be far safer to reestablish reason and natural law for civil matters."

On the contrary, accepting dogmatic authority is the safest path to follow. Yes, the Pope is infallible in matters of faith and morals, but what else do we need? If we accept all that the Church teaches in matters of faith and we live out its precepts in morals, how can we go wrong?

Reason and the natural law do not need to be "reestablished". They are still in full force, but the next step is revelation, and that is where the authority of the Magisterium becomes our necessary guide.

The Magisterium along with Sacred Scripture and Sacred Tradition is the troika that will keep us on the right path. I sometimes use the metaphor of dogma as railroad tracks. Yes, railroad tracks are rigid, but, thank God for that. They get us where we want to go. Would you ride on a train knowing that the tracks over the canyon are wobbly?
0
...
written by Steve, August 20, 2012
In the Spirit of Christian whatever, I will refrain from speaking my entire mind regarding this piece and only remark that it reflects a shallow grasp of both Protestantism in America (and Europe) and of the principles of good government in general. It is full of Catholic conceit (what "dogmatic authority" I might ask -- the kind that led the Catholic church to its knees in state criminal courts of late?) and blind spots. It would be more accurate and fairer to say that all of American Christendom (including the archaic hierarchical "high" churches) are in irreversible free fall... but for the grace of God. (the good Fr has heard of God's grace I presume). Cheers.
0
...
written by Kurt, August 20, 2012
There is room for hope! I'm a revert (after being away for several decades). It's true that those who grew up in the church at the time I did (60's, 70's and 80's) where very badly catechized and the pant-suited nuns of today are both a product of that and partly to blame. But so is the rest of the church. I am now recatechizing in almost the same sense as a convert does by starting over. Since my return I've notices some very exciting things happening. I've even attended my first Bible study. Who'd have thunk: A Catholic bible study. But the very rural and fairly small communitiy we have here does it all the time. And perhaps thats where the New Evangelization needs to start: In the small communities then we can go and have missions in the larger and more morally corrupt cities.
0
...
written by Jason D, August 20, 2012
"Though bestowed by God on Mt. Sinai, the Commandments are also commonly held (even when not lived up to) by non-Judeo-Christians and unbelievers who recognize the natural law written on our hearts."

Since all Biblcal scholars know that the origin of the Ten Commandments likely was the Egyptian Book of the Dead, (from whence they were appropriated, almost word for word), perhaps an honest examination of the the mythic origins of all religions, including Judaism, and Christianity may help in establishing the fact that morality's origins do not lie in religion, and the Theory of Evolution provides the best explanation for human development, both religious and legal, and that the Roman definition of and preoccupation with abortion, while still attempting to deny that that Mystical Body of Christ acually DOES approve of the use of birth control by it's actual use by a majority of it's women of childbearing age, is totally misguided, and useless, as spouted by supposedly "celibate" men in dresses, perhaps a little actual honesty might be in order, instead of yet another sermon.


0
...
written by Hyperbar, August 20, 2012
I am struck by the similarity between de Tocqueville's quote above, and a little poem attributed to Herman Melville:
Rome and the Athiest have gained:
These two shall fight it out, these two.
Protestantism being retained
For base of operations, sly,
By Athieism.
0
...
written by mike flynn, August 20, 2012
seems to me the lapsed catholics are the largest cohort to be evangelized. also seems to be this cohort is the most ardently opposed to RCC. otherwise i agree the decline of protestant demoninations will move see true believers discover RCC. Now, if only we are careful and do not cram latin down their throats.
0
...
written by jay, August 20, 2012
The author seems to ignore one large fact which causes his main argument to collapse. Though mainline Protestantism is certainly in a fast decline in America, much more so than Roman Catholicism, which is in a much more slower decline, he ignores the third main group of Christianity in the US. Evangelical Protestantism is not only in no way in decline, but it is fastly growing. If you lump these two groups of Protestantism together (Mainline and Evangelical), Protestantism is actually barely declining (less so than Catholicism).

Additionally, Evangelicals tend to be more religious and devout than their Catholic counterparts in terms of church attendence and beleif in the 'essentials'.

Now, I see plenty of problems in Evangelicalism, but the author's wishful thinking puts an unrealsitic spin on the statisitics, which actually point to a less Catholic and more Evangelical future in America (but also a more secular America). Additionally, if it wasn't for immigration from Latin nations in the future, Catholicism's long-term presense in the U.S. would be far more grim.
0
...
written by Connie Patterson, August 20, 2012
I agree that we need to become Evangelists for our Catholic faith. I admit that I am often afraid to speak out about my faith because I think I lack the knowledge to combat the errors espoused by many Protestants.
So, I am going to take this free online course and hope many of you will consider doing so as well. It may not give me the courage (I will leave that to the Holy Spirit) I need to evangelize, but I hope it will give me the knowledge to first of all, live my life as a better Catholic and secondly to counter the errors I often hear espoused by my Protestant friends.
Here's the website:
http://pillarsofcatholicism.com/
Blessings to all of you.
0
...
written by Doug, August 20, 2012
Does this prophecy, from Dan 2:44, Douay, apply? "But in the days of those kingdoms, the God of heaven will set up a kingdom that shall never be destroyed, and his kingdom shall not be delivered up to another people: and it shall break in pieces, and shall consume all these kingdoms: and itself shall stand for ever."
Has it been fulfilled sometime in the past? If not, is there a message for any of today's "kingdoms"?
0
...
written by Maggie Louise, August 20, 2012
Ahhh. The Catholic Church in decline? Not so fast. Don't forget the Keys. The Keys are still firmly in the hand of the one to whom the promise was made. We believe that the One who made the promise has the ability to keep the promise, and, although the numbers may be fewer, the Keys are still in the hands of Peter's successor, the Vicar of Christ. We know the end. We know that the battle is won. We just don't know how or when. That's why God made faith.
0
...
written by Raymond, August 20, 2012
Most of the Catholics are no different in beliefs and behaviors than the Protestants. I have yet to find a Catholic who has not WILLFULLY denied one of the Ten Commandments and the faith. So leave the other faiths alone because we Catholics are in really bad shape. I am a Catholic convert, please do not confuse me with the cradle Catholics. Raymond
0
...
written by yan, August 20, 2012
Once again DeTocqueville shows himself to be a prophet. Apparently so was Melville in respect to this issue. I find it interesting that the tendencies and conflicts between Catholicism, Protestantism and atheism, and how those conflicts and tendencies would resolve, were already well understood in the 19th century.

I don't think that the definition of a Christian nation is 'a country that has a majority of citizens who believe in and publicly profess the Nicene or Apostles Creed, as these creeds have come down to us from the Ancient Church – people who at least attempt to live according to the Ten Commandments.' Rather, a Christian nation is that where the ruling elite is persuaded of the truth of Christianity and of the necessity of applying Christian truth at the level of our institutions and laws. Clearly, by that definition, we are no longer a Christian nation.
0
...
written by TtT Engine, August 20, 2012
I believe Nov. 6, 2012 will be our last chance to proclaim the U.S. as a Judaio-Christian nation. The erosion of our Judaio-Christian values since 8-15-1969 [Woodstock] have accelerated to near destructive levels in the past 3.75 years, similar to our national debt. If the Planned Parenthood President is re-elected electorally and/or by fraud, Christianity's days in the U.S.A. are numbered. In your lifetime, there has never been a more urgent time to proclaim your support for the sanctity of life and marriage than by voting against the Planned Parenthood President and voting for Mitt Romney. Our financial descent will properly reverse itself after we cleanse our souls and return to a Judaio-Christian nation striving once again to live the Ten Commandments. Christi Fidelis !
0
...
written by Martin, August 21, 2012
I find it quite odd that any man would think that the Christian view is to force a woman who has been raped to have any child so conceived. It also seems somewhat bizarre to forbid couples the use of contraceptives and yet deny them other any means of birth control such as the abortion of unwanted babies. This would appear to be a policy designed to add to the world's misery, suffering and poverty rather than reduce it and takes a decidedly un-christian approach to empathy and compassion. Oh, and unborn babies are not citizens.
0
...
written by H. (Bart) Vincelette, August 21, 2012
The article makes reference to some of the early settlers who came fleeing religious persecution in their home countries. Arguably, some of the best known might be the 'Pilgrims' of Plymouth Rock fame. People who value truth in history should be reminded that the pilgrims did indeed flee Britain seeking religious freedom for themselves. And they found it, ....in Holland. But they also found across the board freedom of religion for all faiths, & weren't about to tolerate that, so they headed for .....Plymouth Rock?
0
...
written by Lisa G, August 21, 2012
There is so much Catholic info on the internet and other places. Does anyone not know how to find a church. The problem is not finding info, but our hearts. So many have turned away from God. Our Father is always waiting for us to return to Him.

0
...
written by ItIStheorientation, August 21, 2012
Corruption in the Catholic church gave rise to Protestantism (Protest). It is Catholicism that has been in free fall since VCII. While the pope spends his time pursing peace agreements w/corrupt Episcopalians and Lutherans and worshipping strange gods, the faithful Catholic has either gone back to Pre-VCII Catholicism or become an evangelical/non-denominational protestor against the corruption of all the Christian denominations. I don't see them coming back any time soon to the corrupt Cardinal Dolan Catholicism where the largest land owner in NY gets the job for transferring assets around illegally so children who have been anally raped (boundary violations as Bishop Chaput euphemises) by priests won't get their legally entitled damages. Where the money collected for the priests' retirement, goes to pay homosexual rape suits (or into the Cardinal's mansion or homosexual vacation (Lynch) or trinkets for his sex partner, or blackmail payola Weakland). Where Cardinal Dolan serves the McCarrick Homosexual Democrat McManus club and spreads a "charity" banquet for the champion of baby murder in the sight of his victims (50 million dead babies and counting!) and then apologizes "IF he's offended "anyone""... "Jesus of Nazareth" died back in AD 33, the fetuses aren't human til they're born, and the "protestors" are terrorists who need to be gunned down by Obama's gay military...
0
...
written by Magdalene, August 21, 2012
Yes, our society is 'going to hell in a handbasket'. What do we do? We start with ourselves. A holy soul makes a tremendous difference in this world; it is a light that cannot be overcome by the darkness. We are called upon--each of individually--to live out our baptismal promises, stengthened by our confirmation. We must pray, sacrifice, and live an intense sacramental life. This will prepare us for the action called for.
0
...
written by The Sanity Inspector, August 21, 2012
Who was that Italian who said that the Protestant morality doesn't stop anyone from sinning, it just stops them from enjoying it?
0
...
written by Tom, August 21, 2012
I used to be a Catholic but have come to the point where I no longer believe in God, heaven, or hell. This has been a lifelong transition but has become a stronger position based most recently on the discovery of numerous planets around other stars. The kepler sateliite has discovered over 2000 potential planets in one very small area of the sky. A number these planets have been determined to be within the habitable zone of various stars. Many other planets have been discovered using other telescopes.

The universe is estimated to be around 13.7 billion years old and the earth is estimated to be around 4.5 billion years old. Based on the data received to date, astronomers calculate that there may be as many as 60 million earthlike planets in our galaxy alone. Further, Astronomers calculate that there may be as many as 400 billion galaxies in the visible universe. Many of the chemicals that exist on earth have been shown to exist in space. We have even been able to identify chemical components of the atmospheres of a few of these planets.

Life most likely exists on at least some of those extrasolar planets. The evidence shows that humans evolved from lower life forms and that modern humans spread out of Africa - and possibly Asia - starting approximately 200,000 years ago. If it happened here, it can happen elsewhere.

I say none of this to attack the moral truths taught in the bible. If the earth existed floating in a void with only unknowable lights in the sky and no evidence for evolution, it would be much easier to believe. And even a universe potentially full of life does not preclude the possibility for some higher being with an interest in our existence. Maybe the biblical stories reflect an attempt by such an entity to impart wisdom. But I just don't accept the reward and punishment part of it. I think that that aspect of it is too human a concept and reflects our own fears and hopes.
0
...
written by Maggie Louise, August 21, 2012
Then why do you read "The Catholic Thing," Tom?

A skeptic visited a great and learned rabbi to discredit his faith. He found the rabbi walking up and down in his study, reading a book and very deep in thought. After a few minutes, the rabbi looked up and said quite calmly, "But perhaps it is true after all."

And then,

"My son, the great scholars of the Torah with whom you have argued wasted their words on you; as you departed you laughed at them. They were unable to lay God and his Kingdom on the table before you, and neither can I. But think, my son, perhaps it is true."

Perhaps it IS true.

(a paraphrase of an anecdote from "Introduction to Christianity" by Joseph Ratzinger, pp45, 46..
0
...
written by Chris Mulcahy, August 21, 2012
One of our biggest problems in the Church is that our leaders are obsessed with social justice globaloney instead of passing on the one, holy, catholic and apostolic deposit of faith. The Jesuits, for example, who preserved the faith in Europe in the 16th century, have found social issues much more fun to pontificate about than the tenets of true religion. One would have thought they would provide the intellectual firepower to integrate eternal truths with modern understandings, but no they wander away from doctrine to engage in political posturing. Oh how the social justice crowd loves government! You SHALL be charitable--I demand it! And don't bore me with how the economy really works. Or anything about individual virtue, sin or personal responsibility. Jesus was a community organizer, wasn't he? Or was that Judas?
0
...
written by Doug, August 21, 2012
Tom writes about scientific knowledge of the universe.
"The universe is estimated to be around 13.7 billion years old and the earth is estimated to be around 4.5 billion" True, as far as I know. I also know that science has kept increasing earth's age as new evidence suggests that evolution e.g. could not have happened within the former estimates.
"astronomers calculate that there may be as many as 60 million earthlike planets in our galaxy alone," and "life most likely exists on at least some of those extrasolar planets." If you look at detailed research, beyond the headlines, you'll likely discover that 'earthlike' hardly ever means 'livable by earthmen', and 'life most likely exists' is not a statement by researchers but by reporters.
Evolution says that man crawled out of the slime a gazillion years ago and has been improving ever since. Genesis says that man [not the universe!] was created about 6000 years ago and has been going downhill ever since rejecting God's leadership. Which scenario, do you think, most closely matches the headlines and newsfeeds today?
0
...
written by Lucy Repovz, August 22, 2012
Well, well; each one of our opinions doesn't matter. Are we doing the will of the Father in our lives? ... May His Holy Spirit ever inspire us and may Jesus, the Son of God, the Son of Mary be proclaimed the resurrected, merciful High Priest for all men's salvation.
0
...
written by John, August 22, 2012
America is still very much a christian nation in that it is still dramatizing the collective mind-set pictured in this one stark image:

http://www.dartmouth.edu/~spanmod/mural/panel13.html

And described here:
http://www.jesusneverexisted.com/cruelty.html
http://nas.ucdavis.edu/Forbes/CANNIBALS.html

Which is also to say the christian-ism as a would be world conquering power-and-control ideology did not become THE world dominant religion by practicing the virtues, intrinsic in Reality It-Self, of cooperation, tolerance and peace.

On the contrary its worldly corporate power grew entirely via the business end of swords, guns, cannons and bombs.

Write comment
smaller | bigger

security code
Write the displayed characters


busy
 

Other Articles By This Author

CONTACT US FOR ADVERTISERS ABOUT US
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner
Banner