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The Anti-Catholic Catholic Print E-mail
By Randall Smith   
Saturday, 14 July 2012

Several weeks back, I published a column in this space suggesting that in our current pluralistic, multi-cultural worship of the alienated, victimized “other,” some are more “other” than others. Some “otherness” gets you respect and a kind of special veneration, while other sorts of “otherness” – uncool “otherness” – earns you contempt.

It’s simply not true that our culture embraces all diversity; no, people usually embrace the sorts of diversity they like or that make them feel especially “open-minded.” And to be especially “open-minded” and “accepting” of “otherness,” one has to embrace things distinctly different from oneself, which tends to make us look too kindly on some groups just because they’re different, while looking with contempt on others closer to us for no other reason than they’re not different enough.

You find a similar dynamic at work at many Catholic colleges and universities. One of their oddest problems is the overt anti-Catholicism of so many of the faculty, who end up wanting the universities at which they work to embrace any kind of “other-ness” rather than the Catholic one, be it Moslem, liberal Protestant, Buddhist, Hindu, New Age astral projection – anything, as long as it’s not (ugh) Catholic.

An old saying has it that “hell hath no fury like a woman scorned.” Well “women scorned” have nothing on angry ex-Catholics who have decided to ensconce themselves at Catholic universities. They’re like angry teenagers who left home to get away from those annoying, dysfunctional parents and siblings they grew up with, only to be forced to move back home again after college.

The resentment at being forced back into that place they thought they had left behind them forever is palpable. It shows in their faces; it hangs in the air around them; it colors their every response. “O God, not that Catholic stuff, not again.”

I admit to being a bit confused by such people: not so much by their dislike of Catholicism. Catholicism is hard. It’s different. It’s counter-cultural. But I’m puzzled by their propensity to seek out and accept jobs at Catholic universities.

Taking a job at a Catholic university when you clearly hate Catholicism is like taking a job at a Great Books school when you hate the Great Books. Then, once you’ve got tenure, you start saying things like: “Great Books, Great Books, why are we always talking about Great Books. It’s all just a load of crap!” 

Okay, fine; it’s a free country. People can think whatever they like. But why then take a job at a school that teaches Great Books?


        (Terminal) Bust of Homer (British Museum)

I always imagine such a person’s colleagues saying to him or her: “But Great Books are what we do. We didn’t hide the fact that we’re a Great Books school when you took this job. There are plenty of places where you can go and not teach the Great Books. There are only two or three places in the country where you can. We just want to be one of those ‘other’ places!” 

The problem is, of course, that this sort of “otherness” is still too close. I have no doubt there are people who in the cause of “other-ness” want to eviscerate the last two or three remaining Great Books programs in the country in order to force them to embrace the literature of “the other” – just like every other college and university in the country does.

So, too, with Catholic universities. Every other institution in the country is secular and does pretty much what the others do. There is only one sort of school that can do what Catholic universities do. But for a certain sort of Catholic, it’s just not “other” enough. The odd result is that they want their school to be just like everyone else’s.

A modest proposal for faculty entertaining the prospect of taking a job at Catholic college or university: Please don’t take the job if you hate Catholicism. Why make yourself miserable? No one will blame you if you take a job at one of those other “much better” places: places that do what everyone else does.

Faculty who are nominally “Catholic” who take jobs at Catholic schools imagining that eventually those institutions will change and stop doing that annoying “Catholic thing” are making the kind of mistake engaged couples sometimes make. The old saying is that women get married thinking they can change their husbands; men get married thinking their wives will never change. Both end up disappointed.

The educational establishment in this country is crumbling, critically undermined by its lack of vision and its own internal contradictions. College students who pay monumental tuition and rack up crushing debts increasingly can’t write literate sentences or do basic mathematics.

In these circumstances, Catholic colleges and universities should be cleaning up, offering students of all faiths the best education and moral formation in the country. But they’re not. Often these schools are crippled by their own self-doubt and lack of vision, not to mention their contempt for the difference being Catholic makes.

Many people seem to think the problem with Catholic colleges and universities is that they hire too many non-Catholics. Actually, that’s not usually the biggest problem. Many of our best faculty members at Catholic universities are non-Catholic “fellow travelers” who respect the Catholic mission of the institutions where they work.

No, the bigger problem in most cases are those who checked the “Catholic” box, but who really just hate the Church of their birth in the way only a hurt child disappointed by what they consider to be a foolish and unloving parent can. I wish for these hurt souls something other than what they’ve got now, something less painful.

It’s clear that, for such people, Catholic “otherness” just isn’t an “otherness” of the right sort. They would undoubtedly feel more comfortable associating with the sorts of diversity all of their like-minded peers embrace – at other schools.

 
Randall Smith is associate professor of theology at the University of St. Thomas, Houston.
 
 
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Comments (41)Add Comment
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written by ron a., July 14, 2012
Randall---Very good column. The problem is, of course, these people, generally, are not thinking the way you do. Perhaps the operative word is "mission". They're seeking in their own dishonest way a power grab. This allows them to put up with the discomfort to which you allude.
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written by Manfred, July 14, 2012
Frankly, Mr. Smith, the Church's abject failure to enforce Ex Corde Ecclesiae which was promulgated in 1991, Notre Dame inviting Obama in 2009, N.D.'s president, Fr.T. Hesburgh, being very publicly pro-contraception for decades and now l'affaire Penn State, all have left many intelligent people with the idea that a university is the place where you go to attain your degree(s) and you leave as quickly as possible. I liken it to using a public men's room. Avoid eye contact at all times. Otherwise, you might encounter one of the denizens which lurk in universities and men's rooms.
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written by rtjl, July 14, 2012
It's not so different in our parishes. I belong to a parish, the leaders of which, in their desire to appear open and accepting have no qualms about replacing the penitential rite at Mass with a sweet grass ceremony but become absolutely apoplectic at the thought of a little old Italian lady saying the rosary before Mass. It seems we are willing to be accepting of absolutely any culture but our own.
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written by Matt, July 14, 2012
There are always a segment of the population that view themselves with pride as over-throwers of the current order; true Revolutionaries. Their life's passion is to weaken the system from the inside while at the same time encourage and support those outside the order to attack it. Even the Revolutionaries themselves understand that no reform or new order will fulfill them; that they must always rebel. That is why Lenin and other dictators use revolutionaries to seize power and then turn around and purge them immediately from the new order. The Church should recognize these souls for what they are, for Lucifer was the very first Revolutionary. The Church should adopt what God did in response; cast them out.
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written by Nancy Williams, July 14, 2012
This article hits the nail on the head! Prof. Smith's observations are quite astute. I too have observed that often non-Catholic professors are more supportive of Catholic mission at Catholic universities than those disenchanted Catholic folk. What is particularly infuriating is when you get nominal Catholics announcing "As a Catholic, ..." and then going on to denounce and ridicule the official teachings of the Catholic Church. I am particularly distraught by the prospects open to students who want to study at authentically Catholic universities and be educated in the faith by teachers who practise their faith. A university Catholic in name is no longer a guarantee that one will come to learn what it means to be Catholic. Alas.
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written by WSquared, July 14, 2012
Bravo, Professor Smith. This is all very spot on.

For one thing, try being both an ethnic minority and Catholic-- even worse from the perspective of those you describe if you're actually practicing, because clearly, you're "backward," and weren't "smart enough" to reject the Catholic faith like they were (...which of course raises all kinds of interesting issues vis-a-vis an unquestioning and blind faith in the Enlightenment and in Progressivism). You'll find out very quickly about which kinds of "difference," "diversity," and "otherness" is cool, because it makes them feel awesome for being easy to consume, and which kinds make them feel uncomfortable.

The above goes almost hand in hand with the dubious idea, nay conceit, that their being "born and raised Catholic" somehow means that they know everything there is to know about the Catholic faith, and have a right (the more accurate term would be "special privilege") to demand that it be changed on their say so. The problem is that anybody who has left and come back to the Catholic Church knows from experience that not knowing your faith is strongly related to not practicing it, and not living it for the simple reason that faith is not something which we just "have," but which must be nurtured: that you went to Mass every Sunday as required by Church law is one thing, but it's not everything. That much did actually come out during many discussions on the new translation of the Roman Missal this Advent.

A lot of these points that you make regarding what kinds of "otherness" and "diversity" are cool enough tend to pop up in discussions of the liturgy in any case. Note all of the insistence on "cultural relevance" vis-a-vis the liturgy of the Mass, but somehow, nobody ever asks "relative to what, exactly?" and interestingly enough, that embrace of "diversity" never gets to include Latin and Catholic tradition. Other people's traditions and beliefs are always okay, because they're exotic. But Catholic tradition and aesthetics are expensive, frou-frou frivolity that is "just for pretty." And toss around the term "pre-Vatican II" (read: "Dark Ages") and you're off to the races.

"Please don’t take the job if you hate Catholicism."

But isn't that the whole idea? The whole point is spreading their anti-Catholic sensibilities around and getting paid for it while claiming to be on the front lines of "reforming" the Church. It's making a big, bold, bad-a** statement.

I agree wholeheartedly regarding your point that it's not that Catholic universities hire or admit too many non-Catholics. There are lots of non-Catholics who may not believe what we believe, but who respect the Catholic faith. We owe them not only our respect, but our gratitude. Incidentally, one of the reasons why there are a number of Muslim students at the Catholic University of America is that they applied there in order to be in an environment where chastity and talking about religious faith is common, and not something alien or undesirable (when it came to a couple of proposed lawsuits against CUA from some quarters, the Muslim students, from what I heard and read, weren't the ones complaining).
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written by Sue, July 14, 2012
You might as well have asked Alger Hiss why he didn't just leave our State Department and go work for the Soviet Union.
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written by Laurie Morrow, July 14, 2012
W Squared: thank you for a brilliant and enlightening response. I would have thought, mistakenly, that you would have been welcomed. But you're not the "right" kind of minority, it seems.

Running the risk of writing something along the lines of "[Insert Problem]: women, minorities suffer most," when it comes to women and minorities with traditional values seeking employment at a university (not only professorships, but even in my other useful field of expertise, fundraising), there's some fairly significant truth to this.

I actually saw a state univ. provost quoted about a decade ago, saying there were no conservatives on his faculty as they just weren't smart enough. Wish I'd saved the piece. But I just wasn't smart enough.

God bless, and Godspeed.
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written by TheProf, July 14, 2012
The flip side of this is: Why do "Catholic" universities HIRE these people? It should be obvious in any competent interview that these candidates hate the Catholic church. Why hire them? If a key purpose of a Catholic university is to promulgate the faith, then hire faculty that will do just such a thing. Duh....
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written by Jason, July 14, 2012
My thoughts EXACTLY! Fantastic article :)

Jason @ Ascending Mount Carmel
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written by David, July 14, 2012
I agree with the thought that if one hates Catholicism, one ought not teach or work at a Catholic institution. The problem is that many convince themselves that the love the Church, but they hate some things about the Church. If only the Church would change this or that, I would love it so much more, they say. What they don't seem to get is that love demands acceptance. In the human condition, if we seek to change that which we say we love, then we don't really love that which we say.

I one time heard my parish priest say something I've always admired because it's a true reflection of love of Christ and of His Church. Of some issue upon my priest and the bishop didn't agree, he said, "I don't owe my bishop my agreement; I owe him my obedience." That's a wholly mature thing to put into practice. The problem with such strongly dissenting faculty and staff at Catholic universities is precisely that they are NOT mature; they are children.
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written by WSquared, July 14, 2012
Laurie Morrow, I suspect it was a case of "right race, wrong religion": Everybody Knows that all cultures are equal the same way Everybody Knows equally and unequivocally that Roman Catholics are evil, backward, and stupid, and that Roman Catholicism makes people evil, backward, and stupid. They then don't know what to make of you for simultaneously inhabiting two kinds of otherness that they deem diametrically opposed to each other, at least in their idea of "tolerance" and "diversity." You are then seen as some colonized holdover from the Dark Ages just waiting for some self-righteous dissident to teach you all about freedom, love, sex, thinking for yourself, and compassion, and sticking it to old, celibate, mostly white men.

Orthodox Roman Catholicism by contrast holds everybody accountable equally: sin is sin, no matter who commits it, and is defined by what is contrary to God and not as what makes the chattering classes feel icky. Furthermore choices have consequences and things aren't good simply because one chooses them. All are included for all having sinned, all needing God's mercy, and God's grace being sufficient for all. But you wouldn't know that from an anti-Catholic Catholic who deems all mention of sin "oppressive" and who makes self-serving remarks about "their" Catholic faith while ignoring that appeals to private judgment qua "conscience" are simply not Catholic at all.

David, I 'm not entirely sure that we don't change what we love, though I take your overall point. After all God loves us and His grace changes us. He meets us where we are but loves us too much to leave us there. I think what you might be getting at is that the way, the truth and the life does not change and that God is eternal. There will always be a need for reform but it always begs the question of reform with reference to what? To change for the sake of change constantly throws into question who we are.
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written by RJS, July 15, 2012
As a father searchig (in vain?) for a real Catholic college for my daughter, I wish, as an act of charity, you would have named the names of such teachers and such colleges. Pointing out the wolf, by the way, is an act of charity. Not only does it protect the innocent, but it may even lead to some internal reflection on the part of the wolf. May God give us all the grace, not only to love what is good, but to hate what is evil - and if we lack one thing today, it is hatred of evil.
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written by Chris, July 15, 2012
Randy, thanks for this article. I am sympathetic with many of your observations. However, I would not give priority today to defending Catholic "identity" or "first principles" on behalf of the Catholic college or university. In the American context, we see how these are far too often manipulated by ideologues on the right and the left to advance agendas that obscure far more serious ethical problems that have been plaguing American universities for several years and crying out to be addressed. Perhaps the polarization that you are witnessing is as much a symptom as anything else of the neglect to do so. We need Catholic intellectuals and those of good will to revisit the charters, policies, and codes of conduct--where these even exist--of Catholic universities to determine their appropriateness to the complex economic and political landscape in which their universities and their stakeholders exist and carry out the mission of the Catholic Church. They then need to develop proposals for creating mechanisms to ensure that these are enforced in a way that is fair and impartial. This need not compromise Catholic identity or undermine Catholic theological convictions; on the contrary, these would actually be served by such an effort.
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written by Gail Finke, July 15, 2012
WSquared: Our parish had a "day of reflection" a couple of years ago -- the last one I ever attended -- with a priest who extolled the virtues of singing Spanish songs at Mass, whether or not anyone in a parish spoke Spanish, because it sent a message that parishes were inclusive and welcoming. I asked why we should learn Spanish songs when (in the case of my parish) we had foreign members who did not speak English OR Spanish, and no one was proposing to sing songs in their languages. And if we were going to sing Spanish songs, why should we sing one that happens to by in our hymnal, instead of finding out what songs Spanish speakers particularly liked? Maybe they HATE those songs. I said that learnings songs you know nothing about for people who aren't there is fake diversity, and real diversity and inclusion requires work and actually reaching out to people.

Well, people were outraged at my question... and not one person there suggested our parish learn some songs in French, although we had ACTUAL French-speaking African immigrants in our parish! The symbol ("embracing diversity") can be SO much more powerful than reality, especially when the symbol is easy and reality is hard. I threw in that towel instead of doing what I ought to have done, which was go to the music director and pastor and say that the speaker had inspired me to see if we couldn't be more welcoming and diverse to our immigrant parishioners.

And that's why this stuff goes on at parishes, schools, and universities. The revolutionaries are tireless, full of revolutioary zeal. The rest of us have lives.
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written by WSquared, July 15, 2012
Gail Finke, those are really good points (indeed: what makes anyone so sure that they may not hate those songs to begin with?), and brava to you when you pointed out that this "diversity" is indeed false. I've experienced this sort of thing outside of the Church in spades, certainly. And I will bluntly say that it can and does infuriate me when I encounter it in the Church.

In terms of what it means for us to be welcoming, one point that does come up for discussion repeatedly is the horizontal, versus the vertical, aspects of Catholic worship. We have to have both, and can't forsake the one for the other (in many aspects of the Church, our worship and liturgy, we've set the horizontal up against the vertical to the latter's neglect). This is a very crucial issue, because Jesus, and not primarily us, is the real welcome and source of communion and outreach. All we can do is cooperate with Him, and not presume too much in terms of multiculturalist inclusion and activism. And so it begs the issue of how well the way we approach the liturgy either foregrounds Christ or obscures Him.

I am an ethnic minority who is also an avid supporter of the Traditional Latin Mass for those and many reasons; in fact, the two things are somewhat related. By no means do I place it over and against the Novus Ordo, and I most certainly don't "hate" the Novus Ordo. But I think that the latter can learn from the TLM for the simple reason that it's an issue of focus. It's one of the reasons why we had the new translation to begin with.

"Cultural relevance" that in no way puts Christ first so that it's clear to us all that the Mass is primarily about Christ saving us, and not us praising Christ, is ultimately irrelevant. Christ is also alpha and omega, beginning and end, past, present and future. So "progressivism" and novelty for the sake of novelty are likewise irrelevant for similar reasons (because progress without direction or ontological end is meaningless). Latin has the advantage of being dead, in that its words do not change meaning over time. That is crucial for theological precision-- for what we pray is what we believe-- and in terms of the Novus Ordo, I don't see why we can't appreciate both the vernacular and Latin (are we Catholics not a both/and people? Why do so many people like to say that Catholicism is both/and, but stop short when it comes to the public prayer of the Church?). For example, you can have all of the ordinaries and propers in Latin with the homily, Roman Canon, and readings in the vernacular. Latin is also supranational, so it does not "belong" to any one national or even ethnic group. In fact, I'll be bold enough to suggest that it could solve many a problem as to which ethnic group's hymns get "included" or not-- you'd simply be doing what the Church asks of us. Furthermore, as an ethnic minority who is Roman Catholic, to learn to pray in Latin is to learn that I pray with the whole Church. In no way does this "negate" or "ignore" my cultural and ethnic background, but rather, it draws me and it into something far greater and more mysterious than ourselves.
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written by Beth, July 16, 2012
@ RJS--check out Benedictine College in Atchison, KS
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written by Howard, July 16, 2012
I actually was interviewed for a faculty job at a small Catholic university two years ago. In terms of experience, I was a great fit for them, but ... I asked the provost how her university would be different if it were not Catholic. She didn't really have an answer. I didn't get an offer, and I probably wouldn't have taken the job if it had been offered.

That has been my experience also with other nominally Catholic universities. The only one it did not apply to was Franciscan University of Steubenville.
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written by Kristina, July 16, 2012
@RJS: see the Cardinal Newman Society. They have oodles of information, especially their "The Newman Guide to Choosing a Catholic College"
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written by Richard, July 16, 2012
Has it occurred to anyone that these dissidents may intend to destroy the Catholicity of the schools at which they teach? The strategy of the termite is a staple of the left.

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written by frank liberatori, July 16, 2012
Right on target. Look at the lay so called "theology" professors at most Jesuit colleges. They remind us of bunch of radicals planning on throwing bombs at some women and kids. Only they accomplish it by poking a stick in the eye of the Bishops and the catholic laity who they feel must be worked up into revolt mode. What theology are they teaching. Having spent 4 years at St Josephs" College (now University) in the mid fifties--it resembles just about nothing like was taught back then by ordained Jesuit theology professors.
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written by Jack Carlson, July 16, 2012
Having spent over 40 years as a philosophy teacher at Catholic colleges and universities, and having served as a department chair, college dean, and university academic vice president, I am very familiar with the conflicts here discussed. (I even authored a TCT column in this general vein: "Catholic Identity: Shall We Talk?" -- 20 May 2010.) I wish I could agree that there is a simple solution to our institutions' problems. However, given the present academic, political, and ecclesiastical environments, there is not. But I will say this: Randall Smith's fine piece, and the heartfelt commentary upon it, gives steel to my resolve as I prepare to return to the fray next month!
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written by gerald nichols, July 17, 2012
I am one of your ex-Catholics, of many years (80) and I do know quite a lot about the religion. My observations today show that there is a peculiar desire among many calling themselves "Catholic" to keep that "identity" but get rid of certain "baggage" that the RC Church has had for a lot of its history. These folk tend to be Democrats, progressives, liberals and etc. They vote for Obama, support Gay agendas, abortion rights, and have little respect for the Word of God, i.e., the bible.
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written by Alecto, July 17, 2012
The issue isn't why pseudo-Catholics take jobs teaching at Catholic universities, but why they're hired by those whose job it is to first and foremost provide a Catholic education!
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written by Andrew, July 17, 2012
The better question is why are these people offered jobs in the first place?
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written by ND mom, July 17, 2012
The major reason that Catholic-haters take academic positions at Catholic universities is that is was the best offer available to them. If they happen to be Catholic, checking off the Catholic box may actually help them get hired. But the academic market is tight, especially in the humanities and other squishy fields in which the Catholic-haters tend to congregate. (Not too many Catholic-haters teach economics, accounting, or mechanical engineering at Catholic colleges, I've noticed).

So they take these positions, holding their noses, and absolutely HATING the fact that they have to reveal their second-class affiliation at conferences. They are a scourge.
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written by EssEm, July 17, 2012
This is the Catholic sub-set of a much larger Western cultural phenomenon, which Roger Scruton, I believe, has called "oikophobia", from the Greek word for home, oikos. A hatred of all that his one's own and a related indiscriminate love for and lionizing of all that is not, and the more alien and inimical to one's own inherited tradition, the better. All part of the suicide of the West, legitimated as a moral project by liberalism.
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written by The Hermit, July 17, 2012
There is a term for Catholics who hate the Church. They're called Protestants. Why don't they just admit it and move on to one of the several thousand protesting sects who agree with their hatred of the Church. It would certainly be a more intellectually honest thing to do.
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written by Grey Bear, July 17, 2012
Biden, Pelosi, Kerry, Casey, Sebelius, Catholics in Alliance for the Common Good, Democrat Catholics, Notre Dame, all Jesuit Colleges etc. all are defined by this article. They are Catholic in Name Only, CINO's or as I term them, "FAKE" Catholics. It can all be traced to the sodomite-agenda of "bernardin", the deviates he ordained & had elevated to Bishop & the total idiocy of his seamless-garment, social justice (Communist) corruption, for example,'call to action'. At the last USCCB election, 111 Bishops actually voted for his avid follower who narrowly lost to Cardinal Dolan. And you wonder why these Catholic haters employed at supposedly Catholic Universities are hired & likewise the 'party of death', CINO's are not excommunicated for their persistent anti-Catholic votes. The USCCB through their corrupt CCHD actually aided the Abortionist in the oval office to get elected through their funding of the 'alinsky', Industrial Areas Foundation & its fetid, satanic spawn organizations. So don't wonder how this occurs, the spineless leadership of the Church the last 5 decades let it grow & flourish !
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written by Jam, July 18, 2012
NDMom is right, the job market is brutal and getting moreso. In my department (humanities - although, hrm hrm! I wouldn't classify my field as "squishy" ;) ) my fellow PhD students can't get interviews at anything like a research institution and are often left looking at small state branches, community colleges, and religious colleges. I hear them discussing how they nodded along on the campus tour of Suchandsuch Bible College, all the while being horrified or mocking the moral standards. "We used to go to church when I was a kid, I can fake it" or "luckily when I said my dad's a Lutheran pastor, they were really impressed and didn't ask any more questions!" As someone who really WANTS to be part of a faithful Catholic university's faculty, of course this kind of deception really burns me up, but there it is.

Are there any summer programs, workshops, etc, for aspiring Catholic faculty? Something that would be professionally useful, but that would also, maybe, act as a kind of "yes, I'm serious" on the CV -- although sadly at some places it would probably be a negative rather than otherwise.
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written by Bill Kysela, July 18, 2012
I believe that what the author is writing about is not confined to universities, colleges etc. I have walked out of a few churches where parish priests were preaching "stuff" that is not biblical or according to the teachings of the Church - that is: against major doctrinal tenets of the Church, sad to say!!!
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written by Denverite, July 18, 2012
It's really quite simple. Being the anti-catholic Catholic afford's one the opportunity to classify oneself as the celebrated "other," the so-much-cherished intellectually superior minority. We all want to be what we most admire, even be it a romanticized phantasm...
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written by Therese, July 19, 2012
This problem is not limited to higher education. It is a horrendous problem at "Catholic" high schools and elementary schools. I am speaking as a Catholic high school teacher AND as a perent who had to actually teach the faith correctly to my children, even though they were attending these "Catholic" schools.
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written by Harry , July 20, 2012
I have been associated with Catholic Higher Ed. over twenty years and this article BEST describes what I see and get aggravated over every day. It appears that "diversity" has trumped the mission or become the mission in many Catholic schools. In the next twenty years as smaller Catholic schools close and/or remove the word Catholic from their Mission statements we will begin to see the results of this movement. Very unfortunate in my view because the "diverse" education that Catholic schools can provide will be lost forever.
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written by Sean Naughten, July 20, 2012
As an ND class of '61 alum, I can sympathize with most of the above comments...our church has changed since Vatican II and the idea of what constitutes public morality has evolved due to the message of the media that promotes a "feel good" sense of self and inclusion of the various morality "opinions" that come with diversity.
Prayer is the only way to cope with this.
One note that I might add is that although ND is often cited as a non-catholic, catholic institution, I do notice that there is a preducice by The Cardinal Newman Society against ND...i.e., President, Fr. John Jenkins in the past 3 years has led a group of approximately 300 ND students and alum in the annual Washington, D.C. January RTL march against R vs. W, with mass following, yet CNS does not report this...only the negative stuff.
ND MOM please let me know how you child is doing at ND.
johnfnaughten@yahoo.com
Thanks
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written by Graeme Reid, July 20, 2012
There are always choices between right ways and wrong ways. Freedom is in being able to choose truth and reject lies
and deceit.
The modern day moral relativists make up their own morality as they go to suit their own self centered pleasures, desires and power lusts. The moral laws that uphold human dignity and purpose, the only way to true happiness through love of God and neighbour through sacrifice, are thus rejected.
Moral truth though, 'never' changes. Professors who
represent the elite who have wrecked the western world with their nation bankrupting globalization policies and agendas, are out to change truth and make it a lie in order to destroy the moral fibre of society and thus whole
nations.
Nations demoralized and enticed through deregulation, into deindusrialization and consequent unpayable debt amassment, are thus nations under slavery to the instigators of the globalisation that has taken away independence from
America. America was once the world's greatest producer nation and ran surpluses rather than deficits.
Globalization can be traced back to the Founding of the "very secretive' Mont Pelerin Society in Switzerland in 1947 by the elite of Europe, many of whom had supported Hitler.
It set up in London in the early 1950s under the thinktank, the Institute of Economic Affairs under the British Crown; out of this organisation came Thatcherism.
Chief founders of the MPS were 'professors' and all MPS presidents to this day, have been professors (except a couple) and have been from most countries.
One of the MPS Founders was Milton Friedman from Chicago University.
In the 1970s the organisation set up thinktanks and infiltrated others all over the western world to push their British free trade and deregulation, privatisation, union busting and more.
Alan Greenspan who was head of the unconstitutional U.S. Federal Reserve was made a Knight Commander of the British
Empire by Queen Elizabeth II for his part.
Of course there is tons more that can be said but the moral of the story is watch these profesors and scientists;
many are on mission for the elite whose aim is to depopulate the nworld and control it.
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written by dina p, July 21, 2012
I too have experienced negativity. One of our teachers at a catholic elementary school was complaining how she was not happy with the church and it's abortion stance and other things and I suggested to her that if she was not happy she should find another faith that she would be happy with. She was livid and I was made to apologize to her by the principal for what I said.
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written by Wayne Hall, July 22, 2012
The letters to the seven churches in the Revelation to John the Apostle of Jesus Christ clearly expresses the problems in the church by its' founder, the Lord Jesus Christ.The problems, along with the solutions are discussed here. How can we "improve" on GOD's WORD? There is a stern warning about adding to or taking away. I strongly urge everyone to read this. A blessing is promised at the very beginning.
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written by john, July 22, 2012
to rjs: try fransiscan univeristy of steubenville
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written by Tom Hayward, July 23, 2012
While differing with my own faith in younger years, I have come to accept Catholicism as a belief in which I am comfortable and can live out my life without anxiety. What more can one wish for?
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written by Najib Nasr, July 28, 2012
Ignorance abounds! The remedy is to convince the masses to take just one pill, one time: Apologetics! Through Apologetics, I, the 'fisherman', can teach the Christian Catholic Faith to a Christian in one hour!!!

Here's a sampling: Jesus Christ instituted one and only one Church and He built it on Peter, speaking in the singular: You are Kepa, and on this kepa, I will build my Church… (Matthew 16:18-19). Jesus was speaking Aramaic, the language in use by commoners at the time.

St. Ignatius of Antioch call this Church the catholic Church. Being the only Church for a millennium, possessing all the Truth (1 Timothy 3:15), I can call it Catholic, with a capital T. St. Ignatius, Bishop of Antioch for 40 years, was the disciple of John and lived concurrently with him for a third of a century. So, he knew what Jesus and the Holy Spirit taught the Apostles. It was providential that his 7 letters are still with us today. Just Google ‘seven letters’ and read his words, which are the Gospel truth.

Now, you, Catholic university student: Repent; believe; and convert. Then go back home and convert and educate and correct the misconceptions of your Catholic parents. If you need help, I am on Facebook (hint: I was an airline pilot). God bless.

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