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To Fellow Fanatics Print E-mail
By Robert Royal   
Monday, 14 May 2012

What follows is a confession. I admit that I may have finally gone around the bend. Judge for yourself. But the soul has its seasons and unexpected turning points. And I came to one this past week.  

Good reader, I have cancelled my subscription to The Washington Post. There, I’ve said it. I read it regularly for thirty years. But on Wednesday, it ran the same anti-Catholic ad by the Freedom From Religion Foundation that the New York Times published a few months ago, inviting people to leave the Church.

There’s been almost no reaction besides a few weak letters. But at least for me, it’s time to stop supporting institutions willing to take money from bigots aiming to encourage bigots for a bigoted, anti-Catholic cause.

I am not under any illusions that this will much matter to the Post. Boycotts have a long history. They rarely work. And it would depend on enough Catholics and others of good will ready to give it a serious try. There aren’t. Even the archdiocese of Washington and Cardinal Wuerl have remained silent.

And it may be unwise – even self-defeating – to cut yourself off from general sources of information. I’ve wrestled with this several times before. Why should I live a less engaged life because someone in New York, or the DC, or Boston is a smug bigot masquerading as tolerant and open-minded?

There’s no easy answer to this question, but it’s not going to go away – and will likely become more acute as now dominant social forces continue to gather momentum. You may want to stay engaged with this culture, especially if you believe it poses a threat to what you hold sacred. But at some point engagement turns into a degree of complicity.

The Post, by its own reporting, lost $22.6 million in the first quarter of 2012. And its print advertising fell by 17 percent. That may explain – though not excuse – why it’s willing to go bottom feeding for dollars. Circulation has decreased over 5 percent on Sunday and 10 percent on weekdays, one of the largest declines in American journalism. And this in a town that lives and dies by the news cycle.

Some people may draw grim satisfaction from these dire figures. They seem to say that, even without anti-Catholic outrages, fewer people are “buying” the Post’s line. Roughly the same thing has been happening to the New York Times, Boston Globe (owned by the Times), and other former liberal icons. But it’s not good when a primary source of news and information in a free society is evaporating, whatever the cause.

Still, where was the public objection fromthe Post’s liberal Catholics like E. J. Dionne, or conservatives friendly to religion like George Will and Michael Gerson? Don’t they care that they work for people willing to be openly involved with bigots?


             Bigots aiming to encourage bigots for a bigoted, anti-Catholic cause.

It’s true that you can read a lot more online than in the past (the Post is available for free online – and I’ll read it while it is). But this is not yet, and probably never will be, a complete substitute for the kind of attention you can give to a paper that you can hold in your hands and scan carefully about local, national, and international news. In the Royal household, after only a few days, there are already complaints about mornings without the main paper.

Such choices hurt, no question. But what’s the alternative? The media are fond of reporting that significant majorities of Catholics don’t follow the teachings of the bishops. That’s quite true. But how did they get that way?

There was no little cowardice on the part of Catholic leaders over the last half century in the face of a declining culture. But fifty years ago, Archbishop Fulton Sheen and Billy Graham – among others – routinely appeared as columnists in secular papers. They were present in public and helped provide a cultural critique that is now routinely ridiculed as hate-filled, bigoted, and simplistic in those same papers.

The change came about, of course, because other elements in our culture also began to knuckle under to a new idea of society that passes through the state and seeks to eliminate family, church, other associations as somehow obstacles to tolerance and openness.

When you hear about people “bitterly clinging” to religion, guns, and their own values, what you are hearing is the voice of a smug progressivism with contempt for the people. It would be fine if that attitude had not taken over institutions from government agencies to the local kindergarten.

But it’s now everywhere and regards itself as the only conceivable public morality in our day. Do not be deceived. One way or another, whatever you do, it will touch you.

On June 1, Andy Garcia’s new film, For Greater Glory, will be released (it’s already appeared in Mexico). The official website offers a surprisingly frank summary: “A chronicle of the Cristeros War (1926-1929), which was touched off by a rebellion against the Mexican government's attempt to secularize the country.”

Let’s pray that it doesn’t come to that here. In that heroic struggle, hundreds of thousands died, persecution and other injustices became a regular part of everyday life. You can read about it at a personal level in Graham Greene’s The Power and the Glory. I give an account of the whole thing in the first chapter of my Catholic Martyrs of the Twentieth Century. America, whatever we may think, is not exempt from human history.

The bigoted secularizers in America may seem to be winning. The forces of resistance appear weak to non-existent. It was that way under the Soviets too – but history can take sudden turns. Take a look sometime at Vaclav Havel’s essay “Living in Truth” if you want to see how small acts of resistance can bring down tyrants.

However desperate it all looks, the game is not over while there are still some willing to say: Viva Cristo Rey!

Robert Royal is editor-in-chief of The Catholic Thing, and president of the Faith & Reason Institute in Washington, D.C. His most recent book is The God That Did Not Fail: How Religion Built and Sustains the West, now available in paperback from Encounter Books.
 

The Catholic Thing is a forum for intelligent Catholic commentary. Opinions expressed by writers are solely their own.    

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Comments (34)Add Comment
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written by Anne parks, May 14, 2012
Just an antidote..good for you. I am now on vacation in Ireland which has a Long histoy of boycotts. There is a place called Achill Island in county Mayo that was ruled by a ruthless landlord named Captain Boycott. He treated the Catholics miserably, demanding high rents, taking their crops and leaving them to starve. Well eventually they has enough and these peaceful Catholics rose up and and stopped paying their rents and destroyed their crops causing him great trouble with his boss. Eventually Capt Boycott was fired in disgrace and replaced. So you see, we Catholics have a long history of boycotts and infant invented them! If people stick together for a common cause, it will work.
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written by Randall, May 14, 2012
Mr Royal, I understand your decision to unsubscribe from the Post. At some point we do become complicit with evil. I'm wondering how far we take this. I'm thinking of people with 401K's. If we look at where some of our retirement money is being invested - let's say, to companies that produce contraceptives - what do we do? What SHOULD we do? (By the way, the same company that produces French's mustard also produces Durex comdoms. Should we not buy the mustard? That's an honest question; I don't know the answer.)

"It would be fine if that attitude (smug voice of progressivism) had not taken over institutions from government agencies to the local kindergarten." That is one of the reasons I moved my family with two small children from the United States to my wife's home country of Poland last summer. The thought of sending my precious children to the local public school system made my heart ache. I can't afford private school and my wife doesn't feel capable of home-schooling. (I think she IS capable, but home-schooling is an alien idea in Poland; she just couldn't get her mind around the idea.)

Even here in Poland I still take an active interest in what goes on at school. But to give an example of how different school is here - last December the kindergarteners put on a Christmas pageant. That's right, children played the parts of Mary, Joseph, the angels, shepherds, etc. (My little girl was the Star of Bethlehem!) The children also learned and recited a Christmas poem of which my daughter's part spoke of "welcoming Jesus with carols." All this in the local public school.

Like I mentioned, even here a parent should be vigilant about what happens at school. Poland is in the European Union and the EU has certain "progessive" ideas about education and social issues. Polish society is beginning to become more liberal and the EU does apply a certain amount of pressure to member states to toe the progressive line.

But, like the Tower of Babel, there's the real possiblity of the EU project collapsing under its own hubris. Yes, "history can take sudden turns." Stay tuned.

If Mr Royal can indulge me a few more lines, I just want to tell you how much I've enjoyed reading "Catholic Martyrs of the 20th Century" and "The God that Did not Fail" (twice).
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written by Frank, May 14, 2012
"...it’s not good when a primary source of news and information in a free society is evaporating, whatever the cause."

Mr. Royal, the news and information we all respected and admired in this country packed up and left town some time back. What you read now in the rags of WAPO and the NYT is nothing more than propaganda written by a bunch of secular lefties.
Boycotts might not work, but sometimes I would submit, they can have enough impact.
Let's hope that something like the Cristeros War does not happen here. I agree but to take the position that it cannot happen here is whistling past the graveyard of history. The bigoted secualarizers of America whom you aptly describe do have murderous proclivities. Bill Ayers and Bernardine Dorn are on record in the 60's telling an undercover FBI informant they were willing to "eliminate" approximately 25 million Americans unwilling to submit to their new order had they prevailed.
Unfortunately, for these lefties, they are up against two numbers that get in their way. Three hundred million firearms are in the possession of 80 million Americans, most of whom just don't share Ayers and Dorn's "vision" of an American "workers paradise."
So, consider me one of those bitter clingers. The Left can call me all the names they wish but here's something they disregard at their own peril. I like many more in this country are retired military officers. This makes us commissioned Constitutional officers of the United States under Article II, Section II of the US Constitution. Part of the oath of our office is to "Protect and defend, the Constitution of the United States, against all enemies, foreign and domestic." The oath is a lifetime oath. We did not swear allegiance to an individual but to a document and that document will not be destroyed, subverted, or be replaced by another as long as others and I have some say in all of this.
The Left knows these facts and they know it well. The only question remaining for them is whether they are willing to trade their lives for ours. I don't like violence involving deadly force for once we unleash the dogs of war, there's no going back until one side has been vanquished. But the Left knows full well despite their shrill protest to the contrary, that deterrence works...just go ask the Soviets...ooops they're not around anymore are they. That violence never solved anything is pure cliche. Violence is the last option against a marauding genocidal evil ingrained in the DNA of the Left. I like many, would rather die standing up than to live on our knees. Then again, it might be an opportunity to purge the scourge from the Left should they ever tip their hand. We'll spot em' the first shot, after that, all bets are off.
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written by Tony Esolen, May 14, 2012
Yes, time for a massive Exodus ... My wife was watching a special the other day on Amish life. She found out that the Amish sent their children to local public schools until about 1960 or so, when the school districts were consolidated, forcing the busing of kids to schools far away. At around the same time, states raised the age for compulsory schooling, and the Amish then rebelled, peacefully of course. There were pictures of Amish fathers going to jail. The Amish won their fight against the states, but it was interesting to me to see that they had no problem with public schooling as such, as it was practiced in 1960. It was evidently not the open sewer it has become.
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written by Other Joe, May 14, 2012
I must confess that I stopped reading the N.Y. Times twenty years ago. I loved the big Sunday edition and gloried in the book review section until I began to realize that every article, even lifestyle information was bent to conform to a specific agenda, which was anti-Catholic, and, if one penetrated beneath the gloss, anti-human. I thought I would whither intellectually having the source waters diverted so from my boundaries, but just the opposite occurred. To quote an obnoxious commercial, I felt Claritin clear. There is a book out called Mary's Mosaic about murders in the Kennedy era. It is written by a WaPo/Times liberal who wishes to blame the murders on "conservatives". He believes he makes his case. The facts that he presents show something entirely different. The conspiracy was in the media as well as government. The conspirators were all worldly men and most of them were from Ivy League schools. The truth of such conspiracy deconstructions can, in all probability, never be determined with precision. A machine in pieces with some missing is only suggestive of what it might have been like in operation. What does come across powerfully is that those who would be our secular masters are ruthless, self-referenced and operate by deceit. It appears from the evidence that America's Rubicon has already been crossed and the media carried the baggage. The current stage of evolution in government is the flowering of seeds that were planted fifty years ago. Mr. Royal you are now in recovery.
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written by Grump, May 14, 2012
Mr. Royal, I'm somewhat surprised it took an intelligent fellow such as you so long to realize that no respectable fish would be caught dead wrapped in the WP; nor for that matter in the NYTimes.

As for newspapers in general, I think it was Gore Vidal who said: "50 percent of people won't vote, and 50 percent don't read newspapers. I hope it's the same 50 percent."

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written by Mack Hall, May 14, 2012
Viva Christo Rey indeed.

And vote.
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written by Robert Royal, May 14, 2012
Thank you all for these early comments. I thought this one my touch a nerve. But there's a serious question, a theological question, here. A Catholic is not and should not become a sectarian. A Catholic is part of a Church that professes to have something to say to all dimensions of human existence. And if you're a Catholic like me who's made this cultural battle your profession for several decades, it's no small matter to say there are times and places simply to withdraw. We can have aot of fun at the now obvious decay of many public institutions puffed up with their own self-importane, but it's not good for them or Catholicism.

And the frustrating thing is that there's an easy remedy: f only 1000 Catholics cancelled the post, at about $300 each a year, that editors would get the message very quick, even if they are heavily ideological, that it's not worth losing over a quarter of a million for an iffy ad.
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written by petebrown, May 14, 2012
Not surprisingly my take on this is slightly different than yours, Bob.

Yes, I agree, that in the world of PC, this ad would surely be filed under "things that could be construed as offensive to certain religious groups." And also, it's certainly true that no one would be interested in running such an ad directed to liberals of other faiths. Liberal Baptists just form their own denominations. Liberal Muslims (if there are very many) usually maintain a pretty low profile and keep their critiques of Islam pretty silent. So, yes, it's true for varying reasons, that there is a double standard where Catholicism is concerned. Our institution is the most immune to the influence of modernity, so this sort of thing is pretty predictable--and not very new. "The only good Catholic is a bad Catholic" is hoary trope from the 60's after all.

But I'm a little more reluctant in this case to play the bigotry card. The basic thrust of the ad--using liberal cliches to pointedly ask liberal Catholics why they remain in a Church that they disagree with--just provocatively raises the same issues that many of us have been asking for years. Why o why do Catholics who reject the Church on so many important issues insist on staying and causing trouble for the rest of us?

Indeed you wrote a recent piece pointedly asking dissenting Catholics whether it was finally time to give up their attempts to change the Church and quietly find another denomination more to their liking. I did the same when I asked whether the Catholic Church was far too big.

Frankly when I first read this ad in the NY Times, I laughed, thinking that it might have been written by conservative Catholics with a delicious sense of irony, trying at long last to appeal to the dissident Catholic on his own terms to have the courage to man up and do the honest thing and leave.

My takeaway from this: Catholics who routinely reject Church teachings are often much closer intellectually to atheists. And now it is the atheists themselves who have pointed this out! And if the Church is provoking atheist groups to spend the money to launch an ad campaign like this, she must be doing something right.

PS Dionne did post a reaction!
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written by Patrick, May 14, 2012
I switched to Google News + an RSS feed reader (for blogs) and haven't looked back...
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written by Robert Royal, May 14, 2012
Pete - Where was EJ's post? Since I don't see the paper anymore I missed it. And I think you're taking this sort of affront entirely too casually. Yes, it's common, but no less an outrage for that. And after we've gotten used to this, what's next? These people won't stop until they've essentially elminated the Church from American life.
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written by Jacob , May 14, 2012
I agree on all counts.

It doesn't make me feel like celebrating when once relatively trustworthy news sources descend into naked bigotry. I am more sad that two newspapers I respected as a child have made an industry of demonizing and belittling my faith. The fact that they seem dangerously close to bankruptcy doesn't hurt too bad given the way they've treated religious people. But still I'm more sad to have lost friends than I am happy to see my enemies dying.

That said, the reason it got this way is clearly eluded to by Mr. Royal. Every time a Catholic tries to stand up for Catholicism, the quickest to cut him down at the knees are other Catholics (heaven forbid he should embarrass them with his strong statements about religion)! That being the case it seems more to have been inevitable than surprising that American Catholicism fell apart.
When the bulk of your own coreligionists think you're a whacko if you actually believe in Church teachings, how should the rest of the world perceive you?

The answer to putting the pieces back together will not come from a closer relationship with the secularists who brag among themselves about pushing us to the brink.
The answer is to stand up for other Catholics when they support Church teaching. If they are saying something wrong or offensive, then help them to see how to better defend Christ and his Church. The worst thing you can do is abandon the person and console yourself, "pheww at least they don't think I'm a crazy Catholic like that guy!"

(I hate to say it but most Catholics who are against Catholicism reasserting itself are those who seem to put more faith in American secularism than Roman Catholicism.)

But one line the some time anti-Catholic Bob Marley wrote keeps coming to mind: "one and all must come to face reality now". The secularists are going to have to deal with the fact that religion isn't going anywhere and religious people are going to have to deal with the fact that they can't have their dream secular job and a life as an authentic Catholic. Unfortunately those two things are now nearly if not completely mutually exclusive.

I love America and wish I could support it. But the state it is in now is why I no longer donate to any American secular organization. Catholic Church only!
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written by Other Joe, May 14, 2012
Mr. Royal, Christ came for the sinners. It is easy to forget His mission statement. In that sense, a Catholic should not be sectarian. However, there are lines in the sand. Jesus also said that He came to divide. He detested legalism. Atheism by definition is legalism because there can be no spirit to the law, only the letter. Any spirit attributed to law by atheists can be reduced to atomized subjective, transitory and conflicting desires or feelings. Any political sect that can deny the rights of conscience to those that fall beneath its power is tyrannical. The rights of conscience must include free expression of matters of conscience and we have already lost that.
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written by Howard Kainz, May 14, 2012
Why don't you change your subscription to the Washington Times??
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written by Mark, May 14, 2012
There are two things I read or view daily: 1. RealCatholictv.com's THE VORTEX and CATHOLIC NEWS ROUNDUP and 2. THE CATHOLIC THING.

The mainstream media have shown they are more propaganda distributors than anything else. Nothing made this more clear than when each year you have 300,000 pro-life people at the Washington March for Life vs. a few dozen pro-abortionists and you have CNN put the camera on 15 pro-abortion activists and have the news anchor say to the reporter on the ground "so the numbers of the two groups are about equal, huh?" This and the fact that the Washington Post completely ignores the March each year. You would think maybe some of their readers might like to know what that crowd of people was doing on Capitol Hill.
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written by petebrown, May 14, 2012
Here's Dionne's piece:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/im-not-quitting-the-church/2012/05/13/gIQAw3vMNU_story.html

I get what you're saying Bob...but I cut my teeth in college in which outrage was everywhere on the left except of course at leftwing tropes directed at conservatives. It's one of the things that ironically lead me into the Church in the first place. So, for my part, I'm instinctively reluctant to spend time taking personal offense at stuff like this or making public arguments on the basis of umbrage.

And if it is true that "these people won't stop until they've essentially eliminated the Church from American life" I suspect they have a long way to go, and are going to have to do much better than recycle tired 40-50 year anti-Catholic cliches in paid ads in a paper whose print edition only reaches around 500,000 people-- a good chunk of whom probably already agree with them anyway.

Again..I think it says much less about the Post than it does about professional atheists and dissident Catholics. If atheists are willing to pay good money to place an ad like this in the dead tree edition of a declining big city newspaper, believing that dissident Catholics are the largest and most promising source of new converts to their cause...what does this say about dissident Catholics?
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written by Bailey Walker, May 14, 2012
Finally! I don't feel so alone. I, too, after having subscribed to the Washington Post since moving to the DC area in 1979 cancelled my subscription after seeing that vile and disgusting advertisement. It literally pushed me over the edge. I will miss the morning ritual of savoring my second cup of coffee while browsing through the paper. But I will not give them another penny of my money.
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written by Robert Royal, May 14, 2012
Pete, okay E.J. commented, but only to say that the Church is more liberal than FFRF thinks and that he doesn't want to leave the Church to conservatives. But that's a different matter entirely. The central fact is this: both of the country's main papers have now been willing to take money for attacks on the Catholic Church.

Howard, I've read WT for years and wrote for it a couple of times a year for quite a while. But it's not in the same leagure with the big papers, unfortunately.
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written by Dan G, May 14, 2012
The Archdiocese of Washington did have a response, in its Catholic Standard newspaper. See:
http://www.cathstan.org/main.a...leID=5139
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written by Robert Royal, May 14, 2012
The editorial in the Standard, too, is not a response by the archdiocese. It's an editorial by the editors of the newspaper. And I'd say a "response in love" is the equivalent of a sign "kick me." The American bishops once understood that you meet this sort of assault with action.
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written by Ryan Haber, May 14, 2012
Too right. Too right.

Only mistake in the piece, though in its implications only: "But it’s not good when a primary source of news and information in a free society is evaporating, whatever the cause." Of course the evaporation of news sources is a bad thing. People aren't buying the Post, etc., any more though, because we realize that it has long since stopped being a news source. The MSM is a propaganda machine that uses current events as its mode of persuasion and a source of advertising revenue. That's all. What the MSM print outlets are undergoing is literally a judgment, a setting things aright, a re-balancing.

Hillaire Belloc's "The Free Press" is more prescient than ever. Thanks for the tip about Vaclav Havel’s essay.
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written by Ryan Haber, May 14, 2012
People are astounded when I say that I don't have a television, and for similar reasons. I do not want to be propagandized that I am short, fat, ugly, nerdy, lonely, tired, unattractive, inadequate or whatever so that I can be manipulated into buying chewing gum or a particular brand of underwear. Just not interested. That's what TV is for. It entertains us to keep us watching the commercials.
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written by Grump, May 14, 2012
Robert, on second thought, you might want to reconsider. After all, it was the Washington Post's crack investigative team, channeling the spirits of Woodward & Bernstein, that reported Mitt Romney's bullying of a fellow student in high school.

It turns out that this may have been only the tip of the berg and the Post is digging further into Romney's indiscreet youthful behavior.

For example, allegations are now beginning to surface that Romney may have:
1) Pulled a girl's pigtails in kindergarten.
2) Chewed gum in class.
3) Went to the bathroom without a hall pass.

There may have been more or less egregious acts that may or may not rival President Obama's admission that he snorted cocaine and used other drugs during his schooldays but we ought to suspend judgment on whether Romney is fit to be president until all the facts are in.

For that we'll have to wait until the Post and its comrade-in-arms, The New York Times, unearth new information on the alleged misdeeds of young Romney.
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written by Janet, May 14, 2012
We, too, have cancelled our subscription to newspapers, however, it was primarily a financial consideration, and secondarily a moral consideration. When money is tight, you want the most bang for your buck, and the Post's reporting is not worth the subscription. It has been difficult for my husband to adjust his morning schedule now that the papers are not delivered. But there is another thought: if the United States goes the way of other countries with Catholics having to put their lives on the line for their faith, the decision to cancel a newspaper subscription will have been the easiest one to make. This shows our weakness, our softness, our wimpiness, when the threat to our immortal life is at stake and we complain.
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written by Marie, May 14, 2012
The response is quite simple. The Bishops should run an ad inviting people to join the Catholic Church.
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written by Sue, May 14, 2012
Freedom from the Press: It's time to leave the Post.

Set up your own links to the best online news sources. Print out articles (even comics! even videos!) for yourself and family to savor over breakfast. Taste the difference a custom news portfolio can make.
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written by toadehall, May 14, 2012
I gave up on news and newspapers long ago. I am happier, less anxious, no less able to function in the world and probably holier for it....I spend the time I would have spent reading the paper reading things that are far better for my hear and my soul. GOOD FOR YOU!!!!
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written by WSquared, May 14, 2012
"America, whatever we may think, is not exempt from human history."

Good. Somebody finally said it. It needs to be said more often. American exceptionalism needs to be put to sleep, and put to sleep now. The quicker the better.
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written by WSquared, May 14, 2012
Janet, you said: "if the United States goes the way of other countries with Catholics having to put their lives on the line for their faith, the decision to cancel a newspaper subscription will have been the easiest one to make. This shows our weakness, our softness, our wimpiness, when the threat to our immortal life is at stake and we complain."

I sure hope it doesn't get as bad as all that. But Americans can either wake up and have that long-delayed conversation we need to have about authority, dissent, democracy and liberty or in choosing to wallow in our materialistic consumerism and self-centered secularism, we will turn "God bless America" into a really sick joke to the grim amusement of people everywhere, whereupon our supposedly cherished liberties will have become a hollow lie. During the Civil War, Abraham Lincoln once pointed out to a journalist who asked if God was on the side of the Union. Lincoln responded, "but are we on God's side?"

And if the Catholic Church is truly what she claims to be, and therefore contingent not upon how frail her human members are but upon Christ's promise that the gates of Hell will not prevail, because the Church and her Sacraments are conformed to Christ Himself, then in either of the above scenarios, the Church will win.
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written by Alan R., May 14, 2012
To Ryan Haber,
I don't have a TV for the exact same reason. When people walk through my house, they notice something is missing but can't quite put their finger on it...no TV. I got tired of being sold stuff too.
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written by Mark, May 14, 2012
I gave up 30 some odd years of subscribing to Time magazine for the same reasons. I'd justify my subscription by thinking: "I need to know what the enemy thinks." Now I'm glad I no longer support them. I still read my local paper, but mostly for the comics, crossword, and some local news. You'll adjust. I did.
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written by Romulus, May 15, 2012
I dropped the Sunday NYT about ten years ago after it indicated it would include same sex couples in its wedding notices. I never looked back and haven't missed it. More recently my wife and I dropped our local paper when they uncritically gave their pages over to the manufactured "story" about Cardinal Ratzinger's coverups of abusive priests. In the latter case, personal messages were sent to the publisher and editor, explaining our decision. The editor actually wrote back and asked us to reconsider. It was a rather lengthy and detailed response, by no means a form letter -- so I know we got his attention. Our paper's circulation is much smaller than the WaPo's, but it's still a major factor in this market.

Being weak, we do still buy the paper on weekends, but from newstands, so we may not appear in their paid circulation statistics. During the week I read the office copy, or else on line, for free.
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written by C. LeMay, May 15, 2012
The newspaper business started morphing into a giant propaganda machine during the Bush I era. I, too, used to read the daily rag, but shortly after Billy Clinton took office, the "news" in the paper went away. Nothing but pablum. I stopped subscribing, missing nothing.

Frank, I am a former officer too, a SAC-trained killer. While you would grant our enemies the first shot, we in SAC were more Churchillian: "I tell you — it's no use arguing with a Communist. It's no good trying to convert a Communist or persuade him. You can only deal with him on the following basis... you can only do it by having superior force on your side on the matter in question — and they must also be convinced that you will use — you will not hesitate to use — those forces, if necessary, in the most ruthless manner. You have not only to convince the [American] Government that you have a superior force — that they are confronted by superior force — but that you are not restrained by any moral consideration, if the case arose, from using that force with complete material ruthlessness. And that is the greatest chance of peace, the surest road to peace." - Winston Churchill, paraphrased speech, New York, March 25, 1949.

That being said, Randall has the best idea for the Catholic crowd, and that is leave the USA. It is going to get ugly here. Those who move to safer lands will be the seed stock that re-settles this area after the blood stops flowing. Just like the co-founder of Facebook (Eduardo Saverin) did, it's time to give Uncle Soviet the finger.
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written by Fr. Benedict, May 17, 2012
"Even the Archdiocese of Washington and Cardinal Wuerl have remained silent"..........Pelosi, Biden, Sebelius.......

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