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Court of the Gentiles Print E-mail
By Benedict XVI   
Sunday, 28 November 2010

The media can become factors of humanization, not only when, thanks to their technological development, they increase the possibilities of communicating information, but above all when they are geared towards a vision of the person and the common good that reflects truly universal values.” This requires that they “focus on promoting the dignity of persons and peoples, they need to be clearly inspired by charity and placed at the service of truth, of the good, and of natural and supernatural fraternity.” Only on these conditions can the epochal change we are passing through be fruitful and rich in new opportunities. Let us set sail on the digital sea fearlessly, confronting open navigation with the same enthusiasm that has steered the Barque of the Church for 2,000 years. Rather than for technical resources, although these are necessary, let us also qualify ourselves by dwelling in this world with a believing heart that helps to give a soul to the ceaseless flow of communications that makes up the web.

This is our mission, the inalienable mission of the Church. Every believer who works in the media has a “special responsibility for opening the door to new forms of encounter, maintaining the quality of human interaction and showing concern for individuals and their genuine spiritual needs. They can thus help the men and women of our digital age to sense the Lord's presence” (Message for the 44th World Day of Social Communications,
16 May 2010). Dear friends, you are also called to post yourselves on the web as “leaders of communities”, attentive to “preparing ways that lead to the word of God” and showing special sensitivity to “the disheartened and those who have a deep, unarticulated desire for enduring truth and the absolute” (ibid.). The web can thus become a sort of “Court of the Gentiles”, “offering a space... for those who have not yet come to know God” (ibid.). . . .I urge all professionals in communications never to tire of nourishing in their hearts that healthy passion for man which seeks to draw ever closer to his many languages and to his true face. A sound theological training will help you in this and, especially, a profound and joyful passion for God, fostered by continuous exchanges with the Lord.
 
 

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