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How do I encounter God? Print E-mail
By Joseph Ratzinger   
Wednesday, 11 September 2013

Vatican Council II began its work with a discussion of the draft document on the sacred liturgy, which was later solemnly approved on December 4, 1963, as the first result of the great Church assembly, with the rank of constitution. At first glance, it might seem to be a coincidence that the topic of the liturgy was put first in the work of the council, and that the constitution on the liturgy was its first result. Pope John had convened the assembly of bishops in a decision that everyone shared in joyfully, in order to reinforce the presence of Christianity in an age of profound change, but without presenting a definite program. An extensive series of projects had been put in place by the preparatory commission. But there was no compass to find the way amid this abundance of proposals. Among all of the projects, the text on the sacred liturgy seemed to be the least controversial. So it immediately seemed to be the right choice: like a sort of exercise, so to speak, with which the fathers could learn the methods of conciliar work.  

What seems to be a coincidence at first glance turns out to be, after looking at the hierarchy of themes and tasks of the Church, intrinsically the most just thing as well. By beginning with the theme of “liturgy,” the primacy of God, the priority of the “God” theme, was unequivocally brought to light. The first word of the first chapter in the constitution is “God.” When the focus is not on God, everything else loses its orientation. The words of the Benedictine rule “Ergo nihil Operi Dei praeponatur” (43,3; “So let nothing be put before the Work of God”) apply specifically to monasticism, but as a statement of priority they are also true for the life of the Church, and of each of its members, each in his own way. It is perhaps useful to recall that in the term “orthodoxy,” the second half of the word, “doxa,”does not mean “opinion,” but “splendor,” “glorification”: this is not a matter of a correct “opinion” about God, but of a proper way of glorifying him, of responding to him. Because this is the fundamental question of the man who begins to understand himself in the correct way: how should I encounter God?


 

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